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STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE:  THE SCANDAL WAS A COVERUP -- ILLUSTRATED SCREENPLAY & SCREENCAP GALLERY

[JANIS KARPINSKI, BRIGADIER GENERAL, 800TH MP BRIGADE] The population was just simply growing, but nobody really had a plan on how you release a formerly known as suspected terrorist or an associate of a terrorist.  General Wodjacowski told me after the first intake of prisoners that this was going to go on for several weeks and at the end of it we might have 1,500 or more security detainees that we would be responsible for.  And I said, "Don't you think you should have shared that information with me, sir?  You know, I mean we don't have any resources to provide for the 200 prisoners in the cells out at Abu Ghraib, and now you're going to give us 1,500 more.  What's the release procedures?" 

He said, "You are not to release anybody.  Do you understand me?  If any one of these prisoners gets released or ends up out on the street, I'm coming after you."

[JAVAL DAVIS, SERGEANT MILITARY POLICE] They would go out in the middle of the night and sweep up every single fighting age male and lock 'em all up.  That's why you hear the stories about sons and fathers and, you know, nephews all getting locked up.  That's what they would do.  Imagine someone coming to your town and taking all the men in it.  They would come in like on cattle trucks.  It was like cattle.  I mean, you come to the back door, I mean, you hear banging on the door, you know, "Bang, bang, bang."  Take them a deuce-and-a-half truck full of scared individuals coming to jail, like "They come get me in the middle of the night!  Mr.!  Mr.!  What?  Am I in trouble? What did I do?  I'm not terrorist." 

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